Enforcing a minimum TLS version - Amazon SDK for JavaScript
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The Amazon SDK for JavaScript V3 API Reference Guide describes in detail all the API operations for the Amazon SDK for JavaScript version 3 (V3).

Starting October 1, 2022, Amazon SDK for JavaScript (v3) will end support for Internet Explorer 11 (IE 11). For details, see Announcing the end of support for Internet Explorer 11 in the Amazon SDK for JavaScript (v3).

Enforcing a minimum TLS version

To add increased security when communicating with Amazon services, configure the Amazon SDK for JavaScript to use TLS 1.2 or later.

Important

The Amazon SDK for JavaScript v3 automatically negotiates the highest level TLS version supported by a given Amazon Service endpoint. You can optionally enforce a minimum TLS version required by your application, such as TLS 1.2 or 1.3, but please note that TLS 1.3 is not supported by some Amazon Service endpoints, so some calls may fail if you enforce TLS 1.3.

Transport Layer Security (TLS) is a protocol used by web browsers and other applications to ensure the privacy and integrity of data exchanged over a network.

Verify and enforce TLS in Node.js

When you use the Amazon SDK for JavaScript with Node.js, the underlying Node.js security layer is used to set the TLS version.

Node.js 12.0.0 and later use a minimum version of OpenSSL 1.1.1b, which supports TLS 1.3. The Amazon SDK for JavaScript v3 defaults to use TLS 1.3 when available, but defaults to a lower version if required.

Verify the version of OpenSSL and TLS

To get the version of OpenSSL used by Node.js on your computer, run the following command.

node -p process.versions

The version of OpenSSL in the list is the version used by Node.js, as shown in the following example.

openssl: '1.1.1b'

To get the version of TLS used by Node.js on your computer, start the Node shell and run the following commands, in order.

> var tls = require("tls"); > var tlsSocket = new tls.TLSSocket(); > tlsSocket.getProtocol();

The last command outputs the TLS version, as shown in the following example.

'TLSv1.3'

Node.js defaults to use this version of TLS, and tries to negotiate another version of TLS if a call is not successful.

Enforce a minimum version of TLS

Node.js negotiates a version of TLS when a call fails. You can enforce the minimum allowable TLS version during this negotiation, either when running a script from the command line or per request in your JavaScript code.

To specify the minimum TLS version from the command line, you must use Node.js version 11.0.0 or later. To install a specific Node.js version, first install Node Version Manager (nvm) using the steps found at Node version manager installing and updating. Then run the following commands to install and use a specific version of Node.js.

nvm install 11 nvm use 11
Enforcing TLS 1.2

To enforce that TLS 1.2 is the minimum allowable version, specify the --tls-min-v1.2 argument when running your script, as shown in the following example.

node --tls-min-v1.2 yourScript.js

To specify the minimum allowable TLS version for a specific request in your JavaScript code, use the httpOptions parameter to specify the protocol, as shown in the following example.

const https = require("https"); const {NodeHttpHandler} = require("@aws-sdk/node-http-handler"); const {DynamoDBClient} = require("@aws-sdk/client-dynamodb"); const client = new DynamoDBClient({ region: "us-west-2", requestHandler: new NodeHttpHandler({ httpsAgent: new https.Agent( { secureProtocol: 'TLSv1_2_method' } ) }) });
Enforcing TLS 1.3

To enforce that TLS 1.3 is the minimum allowable version, specify the --tls-min-v1.3 argument when running your script, as shown in the following example.

node --tls-min-v1.3 yourScript.js

To specify the minimum allowable TLS version for a specific request in your JavaScript code, use the httpOptions parameter to specify the protocol, as shown in the following example.

const https = require("https"); const {NodeHttpHandler} = require("@aws-sdk/node-http-handler"); const {DynamoDBClient} = require("@aws-sdk/client-dynamodb"); const client = new DynamoDBClient({ region: "us-west-2", requestHandler: new NodeHttpHandler({ httpsAgent: new https.Agent( { secureProtocol: 'TLSv1_3_method' } ) }) });

Verify and enforce TLS in a browser script

When you use the SDK for JavaScript in a browser script, browser settings control the version of TLS that is used. The version of TLS used by the browser cannot be discovered or set by script and must be configured by the user. To verify and enforce the version of TLS used in a browser script, refer to the instructions for your specific browser.

Microsoft Internet Explorer
  1. Open Internet Explorer.

  2. From the menu bar, choose Tools - Internet Options - Advanced tab.

  3. Scroll down to Security category, manually check the option box for Use TLS 1.2.

  4. Click OK.

  5. Close your browser and restart Internet Explorer.

Microsoft Edge
  1. In the Windows menu search box, type Internet options.

  2. Under Best match, click Internet Options.

  3. In the Internet Properties window, on the Advanced tab, scroll down to the Security section.

  4. Check the User TLS 1.2 checkbox.

  5. Click OK.

Google Chrome
  1. Open Google Chrome.

  2. Click Alt F and select Settings.

  3. Scroll down and select Show advanced settings....

  4. Scroll down to the System section and click on Open proxy settings....

  5. Select the Advanced tab.

  6. Scroll down to Security category, manually check the option box for Use TLS 1.2.

  7. Click OK.

  8. Close your browser and restart Google Chrome.

Mozilla Firefox
  1. Open Firefox.

  2. In the address bar, type about:config and press Enter.

  3. In the Search field, enter tls. Find and double-click the entry for security.tls.version.min.

  4. Set the integer value to 3 to force protocol of TLS 1.2 to be the default.

  5. Click OK.

  6. Close your browser and restart Mozilla Firefox.

Apple Safari

There are no options for enabling SSL protocols. If you are using Safari version 7 or greater, TLS 1.2 is automatically enabled.